astronomy

A gigantic arc of galaxies has been discovered spanning 3.3 billion light-years

A gigantic arc of galaxies has been discovered spanning 3.3 billion light-years

Astronomers have made a very interesting discovery that has been dubbed the Giant Arc. The newly discovered crescent of galaxies spans 3.3 billion light-years and is described as one of the largest known structures in the universe. The massive size of the ark of galaxies is challenging some of the basic assumptions astronomers hold about the cosmos.

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Giant blinking star discovered at the center of the galaxy dubbed VVV-WIT-08

Giant blinking star discovered at the center of the galaxy dubbed VVV-WIT-08

Astronomers have discovered what they call a giant "blinking" star towards the center of the Milky Way galaxy. The star is called VVV-WIT-08, and it's 25,000 light-years away from Earth. The mysterious star was observed in the sky as it decreased in brightness by a factor of 30, making it almost disappear from the sky.

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Over 500 fast radio bursts captured by the CHIME telescope in its first 12 months

Over 500 fast radio bursts captured by the CHIME telescope in its first 12 months

It's challenging to capture a fast radio burst or FRB. To capture an FRB, a radio telescope has to be pointed in just the right direction. FRBs are bright flashes of light that register in the radio band of the electromagnetic spectrum and only exist for a few milliseconds before they vanish without a trace. Scientists have spotted FRBs in our galaxy and distributed throughout the universe.

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Astronomers think they discovered a new magnetar bringing the total to 25

Astronomers think they discovered a new magnetar bringing the total to 25

Astronomers have made a discovery that could be significant. On June 3, astronomers received a brief x-ray burst that happened close to the galactic plane. The burst was captured by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope, and follow-up analysis have seemingly confirmed the burst was emitted by a previously unknown magnetar.

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Ring of Fire solar eclipse happens on Thursday

Ring of Fire solar eclipse happens on Thursday

Skywatchers will want to be on the lookout for a solar eclipse happening Thursday morning, June 10. It will be the first solar eclipse of the year, and the moon will almost entirely block the sun leaving only a little of the sun outside of the moon's shadow. The only part of the sun visible from behind the moon is a ring, which gives the eclipse its ring of fire name.

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Astronomers note a significant difference in material ejected from a massive protostar

Astronomers note a significant difference in material ejected from a massive protostar

Astronomers are always studying young stars and other objects in the universe to learn more about star formation and science in general. A group studying a fast-moving jet of material being ejected by a massive still-forming star has found a significant difference between that jet and jets of material ejected by less-massive young stars. The astronomers made the discovery using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array.

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New dark matter map relied on the light from millions upon millions of galaxies

New dark matter map relied on the light from millions upon millions of galaxies

It's hard for most of us to fathom that every star we see in the nighttime sky is another sun similar to our own. Scientists are discovering that around many of those stars are orbiting planets creating vast numbers of solar systems. There are other objects in the nighttime sky that we can't see, including dark matter.

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Skywatchers have the opportunity to see the ISS zip across the sky tonight

Skywatchers have the opportunity to see the ISS zip across the sky tonight

Tonight backyard astronomers have the opportunity, weather permitting, to see the International Space Station flies across the sky. The ISS should be easy to spot with the naked eye because it's the third-brightest object in the nighttime sky, and it constantly moves. The ISS will look like an airplane as it passes overhead, but it will be moving much faster.

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Astronomers look at a cross-section of galaxy UGC 10738

Astronomers look at a cross-section of galaxy UGC 10738

There are some aspects of our galaxy that are extremely unique, at least as far as we know. The main aspect is our galaxy is the only one we know of that contains life. However, it turns out that other than supporting life, our galaxy is not exactly unique. Scientists have observed a cross-section of galaxy UGC 10738 as seen edge-on using the ESO Very Large Telescope in Chile.

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Astronomers discover the oldest known spiral galaxy

Astronomers discover the oldest known spiral galaxy

The image below is a picture of the oldest known spiral galaxy that scientists say formed 12.4 billion years ago. The ancient galaxy is named BRI 1335-0417, and the image was taken by the Atacama Large Millimeter\submillimeter Array (ALMA) telescope in Chile. The image is notable because it shows that spiral galaxies were formed as soon as 1.4 billion years after the Big Bang. Photographs such as this are essentially looking back in time because we see it as it was over a billion years ago because of the amount of time it took its light to reach us.

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Hubble Space Telescope pinpoints the locations of five fast radio bursts

Hubble Space Telescope pinpoints the locations of five fast radio bursts

Astronomers have used the Hubble Space Telescope to trace the locations of five very brief and powerful fast radio bursts (FRBs). FRBs are events that generate as much energy in a thousand of a second as the sun does in an entire year. By their nature, FRBs are transient and disappear faster than the blink of an eye. Because of the speed at which they originate and disappear, scientists have had difficulty determining where they come from.

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Research highlights hidden processes at work deep inside stars

Research highlights hidden processes at work deep inside stars

Astronomers know that massive stars typically end their lives in supernovae explosions. Those explosions forge elements that we know on the periodic table. Astronomers say how elemental nuclei mix inside these enormous stars has a significant impact on the understanding of the evolution of the stars before exploding. Knowing how those elemental nuclei mix within the massive stars is one of the most significant mysteries for scientists who study their structure and evolution.

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